In the moment

Caregiver Tactics

Find out how you can stay connected with your loved one by hearing what's worked for others.

 

In the Moment

How to live in the moment with Alzheimer's disease.

Transcript:

Judith, Caregiver for Mother, 4 Years, Texas:
I always try to give her something to hold on to for that moment, because in that moment is all that matters because five minutes from now, she's going to forget I was even there.

Laura, Caregiver for Mother, 8 Years, California:
My mom’s generation believes that anything that the doctor tells you is law, and that helped me a lot every time she would say, “Can I catch a ride home with you, can you drop me off at the house when you leave today?” And I’ll say “Well you know the doctor wanted you to stay here another day.”  I don’t say two weeks, a year, forever.

Joanne, Caregiver for Husband, 5 Years:
He asks me every day, “When can I come home?” or everyday that I’m there, “When can I come home? When are you gonna get me out of here?,” but he won’t even remember that I was there by the evening. And I tell him I am here every day.

Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias can cause a person to act in different and unpredictable ways.

Dennis, Caregiver for Father-in-Law, 4 Years, Pennsylvania:
…even though they've been with us for four and a half years, he thinks he's on vacation.  And he wants to go home.  But you ask him where home is and he's not sure where home is.

Judith, Caregiver for Mother, 4 Years, Texas
Be really caring, because you can love somebody, but if you don't really care about that person, you will not be a good caregiver and you won't be involved like you need to.  Realize that it's a commitment, it's time, and you've got to dedicate a lot of the energy from your heart.

Try distracting someone with Alzheimer’s disease if communication creates problems. For example, offer a fun activity such as a snack or a walk around the neighborhood.

Dalel, Caregiver for Husband, 5 Years, California:
I was taking it day by day until one person told me, you know what – just one hour at a time and that’s how – it’s been very helpful to me because that allows me to just you know have a short term goal.

Living in the Moment with Alzheimer’s Disease

 

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Content sponsored by Forest Laboratories, Inc.